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PAGE TWELVE

From Paul and Linda M in W Virginia
comes these great axes


Hiwassee Island pipe axe
 Pipe axe length = 7 1/2", Bit
width = 2 1/2", Diamond eye = 1"
This fine pipe axe is forged from a musket barrel with the
  rifle bore - lands and grooves and part of the front
  site dovetail showing on the octagonal pipe. This
  pipe tomahawk, which has a maker's mark of MFH, was
  reportedly dug on Hiwassee Island near Benton, TN on
  the largest Cherokee trade village.
Hiwassee Island
Sixteen-year-old  Sam Houston ("Co-lo-neh"--The Raven)
 spent the better  part of three years on Hiwassee
Island in the village of Cherokee chief Ooleteka,
 who  became Houston's  adoptive father.



Octagonal Faceted Spike Axe               Head:     6 1/8
(Philadelphia County, PA)               Bit:     2 ¼
                                   Eye:     5/8 (round)
                                   Spike:     2 ½
                                   Length:     14

The Octagonal Faceted Spike Axe was found near Philadelphia,
 Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania. I believe the octagonal faceted
spike is very unique.





English Pipe Axe (Pewter mouthpiece)          Head:     7 ½
(Allen County, OH)                    Bit:     2 ½
                                   Eye:     1 5/8 (oval)
                                   Length:     21 ¼

The English Pipe Axe was found near the city of Lima, Allen County, Ohio.
The axe strongly resembles the pipe tomahawk presented to James Galloway
by Tecumseh at the signing of the treaty between the Shawnees and
the white settlers in Ohio.
(Beware. There are currently cast of this pattern being produced
Click on the image below to see an example of one of the fakes)




Red Square-Eared Spike Axe               Head:     7 ¼
                                   Bit:     2 ¼
                                   Eye:     1 (elongated oval)
                                   Spike:     3
The axe below is a classic, circa 1780-1840
spike axe and the in the style of what later became the Underhill
"tomahawk pattern"




Kansas Spike Axe (Topeka, KS)          Head:     7 ¼
                                   Bit:     2 ¼
                                   Eye:     1 (elongated oval)
                                   Spike:     3
                                   Length:     25





Fort Harmar Hammer Poll               Head:     7
(Washington County, OH)               Bit:     2 ¾
                                   Eye:     1 1/8 (round - pierced)
                                   Length:     14 ¼
The Fort Harmar Hammer Poll Axe was found near Marietta,
 Washington County, Ohio. Marietta, which borders the Ohio River, was
the first settlement in the State of Ohio and The Northwest Territory.




Maine Hammer Poll
 Head: 5"    Bit:     3
                                   Eye:     1 3/8 (oval)



French Hammer Poll
(Pinellas County, FL)    
       Head:     6 ½         Bit:     4 ¼
                                   Eye:     1 1/8 (elongated oval)
                                   Length:     10 ¼
The French Hammer Poll Axe was found near Tarpon
Springs, Pinellas County, Florida. The blade is stamped
with the method of manufacture Acier Fendu (split
steel) and two touch marks.


Squaw Axe (Jackson County, WV)          Head:     7 ½
                                   Bit:     3 ¾
                                   Eye:     2 (oval)

This Squaw Axe was found along the Ohio River in Jackson County,
West Virginia near where the axes owner's family settled in 1849.


Late scalloped blade spike axe, circa 1840-1880
Cast steel, produced toward the end of the spike
axe era and and one of the first of what might be
considered a "factory" made spike axe


The COL. WILLIAM  LOWTHER pipe axe.
(Beware. There are currently cast of this pattern being produced
Click on the image below to see an example of one of the fakes)




COL. WILLIAM LOWTHER was born in Albemarle county Virginia in 1742 not long after the arrival of his family in the colonies. In 1763, he married Miss Sudna Hughes, and they moved to Harrison County, Virginia (WV) in June of 1773.
Col. Lowther was instrumental in the erection of Simpson's fort, eight miles below Clarksburg, WV and West's fort, near Jane Lew, WV. He also played an important part in the construction of the "Old Nutter" fort near Clarksburg, ruins of which still mark the site.
He soon became distinguished for his fearlessness as a frontiersman, and for his unselfish devotion to the welfare of the colonists; was one of the most capable defenders of the settlement in the war of 1774 (and subsequently) and many a successful expedition did he lead against the enemy. He was the first Justice of the Peace in the district of West Augusta; the first Sheriff of Harrison and Wood Counties, and was at one time a member of the General Assembly at Richmond, Virginia. Having served in all the subordinate ranks of military life, he rose to that of Colonel. (Was commissioned Major by General George Rogers Clarke in 1781) "Despising the pomp and pageantry of office", he accepted it only for the good of his country.  On a balmy day in the latter part of October (28) 1814, he passed from earth at his old home near West Milford, WV.


Thanks guys.

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